The PS Vita was Sony’s second attempt at a handheld PlayStation console, after the success of the PSP (which sold over 80 million devices worldwide). It was launched in the United States on February 15, 2012, and in Europe on February 22 of the same year. The machine was made to be like a home console on the go, and, at release, Sony paired it with a number of key franchises.


RELATED: The Best Open-World Games On The PSP & PS Vita

These games took advantage of all of the system’s key features, like the touchpad on the back, the camera, and the motion sensors. For those considering which PlayStation Vita games to get for a recently-retro library of classics, there are plenty of great Vita-exclusive titles to choose from.

GAMERANT VIDEO OF THE DAY

6/6 Tearaway

Tearaway is one of the most innovative PlayStation Vita games out there. It’s a fun experience that wants to show how powerful creativity and stories can be, so it’s good that it never runs out of ideas. In fact, Tearaway is eager to show the player new things all the way to the end. It lets them do things they’ve never done before and shows them, in a magical way, how the Vita is a gaming device that can do things no other device can.

It’s a nice way to tell a simple story. The player is in charge of iota or atoi (depending on their preference), who are both the messenger and the envelope. Their goal is to go to the player, who represents the sun, and hand off a message to the gamer.

5/6 LittleBigPlanet PS Vita

LittleBigPlanet PS Vita is a portable version of LittleBigPlanet. The game allows players to play story levels and get special prizes, versus games like air hockey that they and the person next to them can play on the same touch screen, and potentially an almost infinite number of user-created games that are unlike anything this franchise has ever seen.

RELATED: Best RPGs Available On The PS Vita, Ranked

The gamer joins Sackboy in his journey to rescue Craftworld as he travels through five planets with over 40 stages. The plot is filled with cutely crazy characters. Playing the tale allows the player to earn stickers, unlock costumes, and participate in Sony’s version of Mario Bros. The majority of the time, the player’s aim is to go from the left to the right side of the screen while jumping on enemies, using hooks, and avoiding immediate death.

4/6 Wipeout 2048

This game begins in 2048 and provides a glimpse into the early years of the antigravity racing league. It takes place in a world that is halfway between a recognizable, present metropolitan setting and the hyper-futuristic, neo-Tokyo that it will supposedly become in the future. The idea of moving away from the highly stylized look that has overtaken the series’ visual design is interesting.

Still, this is a lot like the Wipeout that fans are familiar with. It’s all about going fast, using air brakes to get around tight corners without losing speed, and trying to beat the other drivers. As fans would expect, there are a lot of speed boost pads and pick-up panels. The latter are split into two groups: items that help the player defend and power-ups that help them attack. So, if they’re in first place, it’s probably best to hit the green pads, in order to get shields, speed boosts, and so on.

3/6 Muramasa Rebirth

Muramasa Rebirth is without a doubt the most visually appealing game on the PlayStation Vita. It’s not as realistic as Uncharted: Golden Abyss or Killzone: Mercenary, but it’s undeniably beautiful and stylish. While it’s not usually smart to assess a game only on its aesthetics, Rebirth’s graphical strength properly predicts the full package’s excellence.

RELATED: Best Rhythm Games On The PS Vita

If the gamer played Muramasa: The Demon Blade on Wii, they will find Rebirth on PS Vita to be almost similar. The only modifications are a fresh translation, improved button mapping, and HD visuals. It’s a fast-paced, responsive side-scrolling action RPG with an old-fashioned feel that’s a lot of fun to play.

2/6 Super Stardust Delta

Since the PlayStation Network’s introduction in 2006, a plethora of games has captivated, addicted, and utterly wowed players. Super Stardust HD is a game that may best combine these three characteristics. Super Stardust HD, which was released exclusively on PSN, helped establish the immense potential of downloadable PlayStation games and is largely regarded as one of the greatest titles on Sony’s downloadable service.

Housemarque attempted unsuccessfully to reproduce the magic of Super Stardust HD on PSP, due to the PSP hardware lacking the essential dual analog capability for twin-stick shooters. However, Housemarque resolved this issue with the next generation of handheld platforms. Super Stardust Delta is an excellent installment in this digital genre, and every PlayStation Vita user ought to try it out.

1/6 Freedom Wars

Freedom Wars is most likely the most successful Monster Hunter clone available for the PlayStation Vita. The length of its compelling fight-loot-upgrade cycle is bolstered by the game’s robust gameplay and customization possibilities, but they are sometimes obscured by a few questionable design decisions.

In Freedom Wars, like Soul Sacrifice, there are many characters to meet and lots of things to read. However, unlike Soul Sacrifice, skipping or disregarding the storyline is not as simple in this game. The original Japanese voice acting will undoubtedly be appreciated by purists, but the plot of Freedom Wars seems to get in the way of what truly matters: the gameplay.

MORE: PS Vita: Games That Defined The Handheld Console

bottikcointo
bottikcointo
botcoinxsnet.online
botcoinxsnet.online
botcoinxsnet.online
botcoinxsnet.online
botcoinxsnet.online
botinstagramfollowers
botinstagramfollowers
botinstagramfollowers
botinstagramfollowers
botinstagramfollowers
bottiktokfollowers
bottiktokfollowers
bottiktokfollowers
bottiktokfollowers
bottiktokfollowers
botBoardKings
botBoardKings
botBoardKings
botBoardKings
botBoardKings
botHomescapes
botHomescapes
botHomescapes
botHomescapes
botHomescapes
tweakelite
tweakelite
tweakelite

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *