Warning: The following contains spoilers for Hocus Pocus 2.For the 25th anniversary of the theatrical debut of Hocus Pocus, a novelization of the movie and a sequel novel were published by Disney-Hyperion. The sequel, set in 2018, followed just what happened when the Sanderson sisters were brought back from the dead yet again by the black flame candle. It was a new generation of Salem teens that had to stop them though. That idea might sound exactly the same as what Disney Plus fans are seeing in the sequel movie on the streaming service, but that brief description is where the similarities end.

GAMERANT VIDEO OF THE DAY

Despite both sequels being set in Salem more than two decades after the events of the original film, the two are very different stories with completely different sets of characters. Some differences are likely down to availability of actors in addition to just what story the writers of the different projects wanted to bring to life.

RELATED: 8 Strongest Evil Witches In Movies, Ranked

The sequel novel relied heavily on nostalgia for fans who grew up watching the original movie. As such, the brand new characters introduced on the page included the daughter of Max and Allison, the main teens of the first movie, and her friends. Max, Allison, and Max’s little sister Dani don’t get mentioned by name in the Disney Plus sequel at all, and as far as the audience can see, none of the new characters are related to them.

Instead, the high schoolers at the center of the story aren’t connected to the events of the original movie, which makes sense considering they would have been born over a decade after the events of the original movie. The sequel does, however, maintain a link to the 1993 Hocus Pocus story with another new character.

Sam Richardson plays Gilbert, the owner of a magic shop in Salem. The magic shop is actually the original house of the Sanderson sisters from the first movie, converted into a storefront from its previous museum. While Richardson didn’t actually appear in the original movie, flashbacks do feature his character as a child (played by Jaylin Pryor) witnessing the Sanderson sisters in 1993.

He’s the only new character with a connection to the 1993 storyline as Cassie, Becca, Izzy, and Mike are brand new. The teenage friends experiencing a rift as the result of a misunderstanding in the movie actually have a very similar dynamic to the different teenage characters on the page as well. The novel actually gives original movie characters Max, Allison, and Dani a storyline though, briefly bringing them into the picture and explaining their absence from the action, but that never happens in the movie.

The Disney Plus movie reveals some never before known information about Winifred and her sisters – the push toward witchcraft is the result of the reverend wanting to marry Winifred off at 16 and have another family raise her younger sisters. While their father is said to have died, there’s no mention of their mother. The “Mother Witch” is the one to present them with the spellbook though. This is drastically different from their backstory that’s expanded in the novels.

The novel features more information about their mother, but also about a fourth Sanderson sister. The “Mother Witch” isn’t in the novel at all. Instead, it’s the mother of the Sanderson sisters who is the ultimate villain, willing to use the magic of her daughters to bring herself back to life and become all powerful. As a result, the way magic is explored is slightly different in the book as well. Both the sequel book and movie feature one of the teens developing magical abilities, but the connection to the Sanderson family magic that exists in the book isn’t present in the movie.

While broad strokes of the two stories are similar in the two mediums, like a group of teens being on their own against the Sanderson sisters, there is one glaring difference between the two. In the books, Winifred is unabashedly a villain. There aren’t redeeming qualities to her. Mary and Sarah both demonstrate more human qualities in the books than they do in the movie as well (save for Sarah wanting Winifred to acknowledge that she is a “good and loyal sister”). Winifred, however, gets something of a redemption in the movie’s end.

When Winifred realizes that her quest for power means she no longer has her sisters by her side, she is completely despondent, and even more friendly toward the same teenagers whose souls she just wanted to steal to prolong her life. It’s a quick turnaround for her, but one that’s heavily foreshadowed at the start of the movie when literally the only thing that matters to her is to keep her family together.

Hocus Pocus, the movie’s novelization, and the sequel novel, all indicate that Winifred is power hungry. She calls her sisters useless and leeches on more than one occasion, but in the sequel, as often as she snaps at them, she’s also protective of them. That goes a long way toward making the audience sympathize with her. She willingly allows Becca to stop her when she realizes she’ll live forever without her sisters by her side, and that’s certainly a change from who she is in the novel.

It’s hard to define whether the movie or the novel are the better option. The stories are similar enough that a fan of the original Hocus Pocus movie is easily going to find redeeming qualities in both. The movie is a better showcase for the musical numbers of the Sanderson sisters, for example, but the novel offers fans a better glimpse into the continuation of the original story.

Both mediums offer fans interesting takes on the mythology within the Hocus Pocus universe and a new look at how the witchcraft of the story works as well. Ultimately, just which is better is going to come down to the preference of the fan consuming the content.

Hocus Pocus and Hocus Pocus 2 are both available to stream on Disney Plus.

NEXT: Best Magical TV Shows For Fall

free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins
free gems and coins

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *